Healing a rift: 50 years after 35W tore us apart

Project Sweetie Pie and Kingfield Neighborhood Get Morrill Hall/Tilsen Foundation Award to continue racial healing

Few track the anniversaries of highways, but 35W, in 1963 was a strategic decision to divide the Black communities from the more affluent white communities in Minneapolis–and it succeeded. Cultures evolved differently between the Kingfield Neighborhood with an average of $50,000 and adjacent Bryant neighborhood with an average of $12,000. Other statistics couldn’t be more sharply contrasted. The healing started, and this year exciting events will help it continue.

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Partnership between Project Sweetie Pie the Kingfield Neighborhood Association and the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Legacy Committee

To honor the work of the Afro American Action Committee (AAAC) and Rachel Tilsen, the Kingfield Neighborhood Association, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Legacy Committee (with members of Field, Regina, Bryant, Lynhurst and Kingfield neighborhoods), and Project Sweetie Pie will be creating a mosaic vegetable garden at the Martin Luther King Park in South Minneapolis. This project galvanizes mutual understand and friendship between neighbors in the Kingfield, Bryant and Field communities. Together the Kingfield Neighborhood Association and Project Sweetie Pie will engage people young and old to benefit from gardening, creating art, and culinary classes.

 

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